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Archive for the ‘Current Events’ Category

In case you haven’t been following recent news, St. Junipero Serra was the saint whose statue was pulled down in California due to his alleged injustice toward Native Americans.  He has been considered a controversial figure for some time; here is what Bishop Barron had to say about him five years ago, when Pope Francis canonized him:

 

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For part one, click here.

Whether we are at a protest rally, at the grocery store, at church, or wherever we are able to go right now (sometimes even at work), we see almost everybody wearing a mask.  The eyes excepted, each person’s features are hidden from our sight.

I hope that, among other things, the COVID experience awakens us to (more…)

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Two weeks have passed since the death of George Floyd at the hands of Minneapolis police officers.  Yet the powder keg ignited by the incident is still going strong.

Video footage of the event shocked, horrified, angered, and saddened many, myself included.  I join Pope Francis (more…)

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I’ve been considering posting my thoughts on the George Floyd incident, and the resulting tumult sweeping the U.S.  But I don’t think I could do better than Bishop Robert Barron does in his homily from today’s Mass for the Solemnity of Pentecost.

 

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Well there’s a controversy circulating around a recent phone conversation between President Trump and Cardinal Timothy Dolan, of the Catholic Archdiocese of New York.

Actually, the phone call involved Dolan and a number of other Catholic leaders. Its purpose was to address concerns about Catholic education — concerns related to financial issues, enrollment, and the impact of COVID-19. During the course of the phone call, the president and the Cardinal (more…)

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Well, we’ve crossed the threshold into the second month of our national emergency…that is, for those of us who live in the U.S.  For many other places, it’s been longer than that.

And from all indications, we still have a healthy stretch ahead of us.

During this time of quarantine and uncertainty, faith can be a major source of sustenance.

Most people who know me am aware that I (more…)

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As a New York State resident, my head and heart hang low.  Many of you may have heard of an assault on a Rabbi outside his home near New York City a day or so ago, the thirteenth in a string of anti-Semitic attacks in just the last month.

If any of my elder brothers and sisters in faith are reading this right now, please accept my heartfelt condolences, love, and assurance of prayers.

I cannot help but look at the parallel histories of our respective peoples — viz., Jews and Christians.  Both have spread, like twin streams, throughout different societies, abiding as strangers and sojourners.  Both have endured hardship and isolation — one with the hope of their Messiah, the other with the hope of their Messiah’s Return.

Let us, then, not forget one another, but strive together for peace.  We’ve just passed through seasons characterized by the lighting of trees and candles, which draws to mind the immortal words of St. John the Apostle:

Now this is the message that we have heard from him and proclaim to you: God is light, and in him there is no darkness at all.

– 1 John 1:5

Peace, and God bless.

Acknowledgement

By ארכיון השומר הצעיר יד יערי – Hashomer Hatzair Archives Yad Yaari, CC BY 2.5, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=5840684

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I must confess to not being well versed in George Tillman, Jr.’s filmography.  Up until just a couple weeks ago I had seen only one of his films, and I remember being, at best, mildly impressed.

The Hate U Give, Tillman’s adaptation of Angie Thomas’ 2017 Young Adult novel, has managed to generate some decent buzz — even if, like many worthy films, it enjoyed little or no presence at the awards ceremonies.

The film appears, at first glance, to follow two parallel story lines linked only (more…)

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Not an easy time to be Catholic right now.

Then again, when was it ever? (And if you answer with “the Middle Ages,” I will be happy to point out, among other things: 1) the Albigensian spiritual of the twelfth, thirteenth, and fourteenth centuries; 2) the encroachment of secular nobility on Church prerogatives; and 3) the ecclesial corruption satirized in the General Prologue to Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales.)

I still remember when the first wave of priestly sex abuse/coverup hit the news back in 2002.  At the time I was 17 years old (more…)

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