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Archive for the ‘Movie Trailers’ Category

For parts one through three, click here

It is now time to talk about the effects of the Fall on men in particular.  We got into that a little bit in part two, if you remember, but not enough that we could have anything substantial to examine alongside the consequences for women discussed in part three.

So here goes…

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Well I recently saw Taylor Sheridan’s freshman directorial effort, Wind River.  I miss doing film commentaries (I’m pretty sure it’s been well over a year since my last one), so how about we begin anew with this one?

A snapshot (no spoilers)

The setting of Wind River is the Wyoming Indian Reservation of the same name, located within one of the most remote and desolate regions of the United States.

As is pointed out in the film, this is an area in which Native American women disappear at alarming rates and with disturbing regularity. (more…)

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Well it’s Thanksgiving Week, a time for gratitude.  So my thoughts on Peter Berg’s recent film Deepwater Horizon seem timely.

I guess my only real gripe about the film is that Mark Wahlberg, as well as he does overall, can’t quite pull off playing a Texan.

Other than that, loved it.  Among its qualities are: (more…)

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Here they are, in no particular order.  Feel free to share yours in the comment section! (And yes, Die Hard does count)

1. Disney’s A Christmas Carol

2. Home Alone

3. Elf

4. National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation

…and, of course…

5. It’s a Wonderful Life

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A few of my favorites/honorable mentions, listed in no particular order…

Saving Private Ryan

We Were Soldiers

American Sniper

Unbroken

Glory

Trailer Link (Turner Classic Movies): http://i.cdn.turner.com/v5cache/TCM/cvp/container/mediaroom_embed.swf?context=embed&videoId=1091318

Band of Brothers

Trailer Link (Internet Movie Database): http://www.imdb.com/video/imdb/vi3629711385/imdb/embed?autoplay=false&width=480

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If you are going to accuse me of anything on the basis of this post’s title, let it be lack of originality (a charge I would gladly accept, as I think originality is overrated): I have chosen to construct my title out of those of not one, but two previously existing works — namely, Clint Eastwood’s recent blockbuster film “American Sniper” and popular Christian apologist C.S. Lewis’ 1940 essay “Why I am not a Pacifist.”

First, the movie.  I won’t go into great detail, other than to say that it is based on the true story of Navy SEAL sniper Chris Kyle (Bradley Cooper) — hailed as the deadliest shooter in American military history — his experiences in the Iraq War, and his struggle with post-traumatic stress disorder upon his return home.

Ben ReedAt the beginning of the film, me meet a young Chris Kyle (Cole Konis), who fights a group of bullies in defense of his younger brother.  Chris’ father, Wayne (Ben Reed), tells his young sons that there are three kinds of people in the world.  Most people, he says, are sheep — that is, people who “prefer to think that evil doesn’t exist in the world.”  And then there are the wolves, who prey on the weak and thrive on violence.  Finally, there are the sheepdogs, the strong who defend the vulnerable against the wolves.

Wayne, a Christian father raising a Christian family, intends for his sons to be the latter.  His goal in this instance is to make sure that Chris was acting as a sheepdog rather than as a wolf.

C.s.lewis3

“C.s.lewis3”. Licensed under Fair use via Wikipedia – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:C.s.lewis3.JPG#/media/File:C.s.lewis3.JPG

It is with that in mind that I cite the following passage from Lewis’ essay (which is published along with a number of others in “The Weight of Glory“):

The relevant intuition [used in support of pacifism] seems to be that (…) helping is good and harming bad.  (…) [T]hat intuition can lead to no action unless it is limited in some way or other.  You cannot do simply good to simply Man; you must do this or that good to this or that man.  (…) [W]hen B is up to mischief against A, you must either do nothing (which disobeys intuition) or you must help one against the other.

Between these two citations — the scene from “American Sniper” and the snippet from “Why I am not a Pacifist” — we can gain a pretty decent understanding of how a Christian can choose to go to war, or use force in any instance.

americansniperposterIt is not my intention to get into a discussion of whether the Iraq War meets Just War criteria, nor whether sniping, as a practice, constitutes a form of just warfare.  But a lot of people tend to make this automatic, knee-jerk assumption that to fight in a war or use any kind of force is ipso facto incompatible with being a faithful Christian.

But, as Lewis and the elder Kyle suggest, part of one’s Christian duty is to defend the weak.  And sometimes, this requires force — on individual, communal, and sometimes even national and international levels.  To be sure, such force should always be as minimal as possible, restraint must be preferred to killing, and the death of a “wolf” should be avoided whenever reasonably possible.  But if we want to issue a wholesale condemnation of all warfare, it should give us pause that the weight of reason, history, and even Christian tradition itself is against us.

Needless to say, I am only scratching the surface of Lewis’ essay.  But since my main intention is a treatment of Eastwood’s film, I think I’ll just encourage you to read it yourself and leave it at that.

As for the movie, more to come.

Photo of C.S. Lewis from Wikipedia; remaining images obtained through a Google image search

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I don’t think I have ever physically kicked myself.

But I am a little tempted to do so, in opposition to the generally accepted sense of the term, when I recall that Disney’s “Frozen” was playing in my local theater shortly after it first came out, and I did not go see it.  Had I known what a sensation it would become, I might have rethought that decision.

Anyway, I did finally get around to seeing the film a couple weeks ago.  Apart from some broader reflections that I offered last week, here are the thoughts that stand out most in my mind:

René_GirardElsa, the “snow queen” (voiced by Idina Menzel), made me think of Stanford University anthropologist René Girard’s great book “The Scapegoat,” in which he demonstrates the universality of the scapegoat mechanism across all cultures and its concealed presence in world mythology.

ElsaElsa qualifies as a scapegoat in the classical sense — not merely as one who gets blamed for everything, but one who is:

1) distinguished by some unusual mark or deformity — in Elsa’s case, her (often uncontrollable) magical powers of being able to produce and manipulate ice and snow (if we are looking for a more concrete physical mark, it would be the white gloves she wears to conceal these powers);

2) somehow perceived as the cause of the pestilence or curse on the community — Elsa does, of course, set off the “eternal winter” (though not on purpose); and

3) perceived at the same time as the one who can cure the community’s misfortune — a big part of the quest to rescue Elsa is to get her to stop the “eternal winter,” after all.

Contrary to what you might think, the latter is especially troubling with regard to traditional scapegoats.  Very often, this was where human sacrifice would come into play.  The one with the special “mark” would be killed (“sacrificed”), and this person’s death was thought to bring about the harmony and safety of the community.  Subsequently and as a result, the scapegoat would be deified or “mythified.” This basic societal impulse would morph into a variety of well-known stories (the blind Oedipus, for example).

Anna_Elsa2I hope I haven’t got people depressed.  If so, know that the analogy doesn’t end here.  “Frozen” is a much more upbeat and hopeful tale than Hans Christian Andersen’s “The Snow Queen,” on which it is loosely based — and, ironically, the scapegoat mechanism doesn’t seem to make it into the latter at all.

Hans-elsa-stormBut before I move on, just one further illustration of how Elsa resembles the traditional scapegoat.  I’m thinking of the scene in which Prince Hans (voiced by Santino Fontana) and his band of men come to capture her in her secluded “ice palace.”  In the face of these intruders who appear to mean her harm, Elsa unleashes her powers in self-defense.

At this point, Hans pleads with her –apparently with concern and sincerity — not to “become the monster they think you are.”

If Elsa’s situation in general reminds me of the scapegoat mechanism in general, then this scene in particular makes me think of perhaps the most striking living example of this societal impulse mentioned in the Bible: The Gerasene demoniac.

Healing_of_the_demon-possessedMost people know this to be the gentleman out of whom Christ cast a host of demons, whom he then allowed to enter a herd of swine.  But if we read the Gospel account carefully we find that beforehand, the demoniac’s community carefully maintained his status as village outcast by chaining him to the tombs.  What results is a vicious circle.  The demoniac rages about, breaks his chains, gashes himself with stones…in short, “becomes the monster they think he is.”

This chaining is both literal and symbolic.  It is a concrete manifestation of the community’s determination to keep him trapped in his scapegoat status.  Elsa faces a somewhat similar situation in “Frozen.”  But, like the Gerasene demoniac, she is rescued by Christ — although in a more indirect, disguised, and admittedly symbolic form.

We’ll get into that next time.

“Frozen” stills obtained through a Google image search; remaining images from Wikipedia

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