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Archive for the ‘Documentary’ Category

Young red-haired boy facing away from camera, stacking a seventh can atop a column of six food cans on the kitchen floor. An open pantry contains many more cans.

So we’re right in the middle of Autism Awareness Month, and a friend of mine recently shared with me a wonderful video documenting the struggles and triumph of Carly Fleischmann, a nonverbal autistic teenager.

But before we get to the video (and I do encourage you to watch it; it’s less than 10 minutes long), I should spend a moment on how it fits into the overall purpose of Into the Dance — specifically, how I see it in relation to the Catholic worldview I hold dear.

What it comes down to is the inviolable dignity of the human person.  This dignity is much greater than we think — so great that it cannot be expressed in the trappings of fame, power, prestige, accomplishment, or even ability.  On the contrary, it is at its height in hiddenness.

Thomas Howard puts it this way:

[Speaking of a wheelchair-bound child]: Who knows what glory inhabits that enfeebled frame?  What honor is incubating there, quite hidden from worldly eyes?  Or what of the Down’s syndrome child?  What exquisite fruit is adumbrated in the sweetness and vulnerability that gild this child’s limitations?  The answer to such questions lies hidden among the secrets laid up by the Divine Mercy. (pg. 219-20)

Lest we doubt this, let us see how this can become clear in the natural course of things:

Reference

  1. The original uploader was Andwhatsnext at English Wikipedia The original uploader was Andwhatsnext at English Wikipedia – Originally from en.wikipedia; description page is/was here., CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=5118849
  2. Howard, Thomas.  On Being Catholic.  San Francisco: Ignatius, 1997.

 

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As many of you know, Blesséd Teresa of Calcutta — more commonly known as Mother Teresa — is set to be declared a saint this coming Fall.

Take a couple minutes to watch the following interview (really, it’s only about 2 minutes long; this video features the same interview three times in a row, for some reason), in which the great saint shares her beautiful philosophy of life.  And have a few tissues ready, just in case 🙂

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I love it when I get to let visual media do the talking for me, so here we go 🙂

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NOTE: As in previous posts, I have embedded the entire video for aesthetic purposes only.  Feel free to watch that if you wish (the first 10 minutes consist of a preview of the “Catholicism” series as a whole), but for the beginning of this particular episode — titled “The Church: Christ’s Mystical Body” — click here.

Please enjoy the video, whether you are a Catholic seeking to delve deeper into the Faith or a non-Catholic person who is interested in learning more about the Catholic Church, even if only from a cultural or sociological perspective.

(Before you watch, I just need to make a quick note about the Crusades and the Inquisition: These were more complicated affairs than what has been presented to us over the centuries, and I think Fr. Barron was probably just unaware of some of the relevant research when filming this episode.

I am not saying this as a defensive Catholic trying to construe Catholic history as spotless and pristine.  Believe me, it is a fact that Catholics at all levels of Church life and hierarchy have done strange, terrible, and unconscionable things over the past two millennia.  But I would be remiss if I did not offer clarification in those particular areas where clarification is necessary.  But that’s all a matter for another post.)

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Not a new film, but probably sufficiently little-known that it can stand a “spot.”

 

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It has saddened me in recent years that Catholics — members of a tradition that has over the centuries created such beautiful art, architecture, music, poetry, literature, and other forms of artistic expression — have had difficulty achieving quality in the art of film (with a few notable exceptions, such as “The Passion of the Christ”).

But I think a new “wind” is blowing, and that this an example.  If you have about 10 minutes, give it a watch.  You won’t regret it.

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A brief look into the life of one of Christianity’s many strong female figures:

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