Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Psychology’ Category

This is a video featuring one of my former professors, Dr. Brent Robbins (and please keep in mind that I attended a secular college).

I don’t know if I’ve ever mentioned this on Into the Dance, but I was what you would call a garden-variety “cafeteria Catholic” up until age 22.

At that point in my life, questions about the ultimate claims of my faith kept bothering me; and try as I might, I could not push them off.

Knowing that Dr. Robbins was Catholic, but also knowing him to be a thoughtful intellectual and supposing that he would, not doubt, be able to help me get past the psychological roadblocks that were causing me to regard matters of organized religion with undue seriousness, I asked if I could come to him for one-on-one counseling sessions.

He agreed.  And contrary to my expectations, subsequent conversations with Dr. Robbins were instrumental in my re-embracing the Faith.

Please don’t misunderstand me.  At no point during our discussions did I get the sense that he was trying to “convert” me.

Rather, he listened attentively to my concerns, encouraged me (as a psychologist, not as a spiritual director) to face the issues that were bothering me head-on rather than trying to suppress them, and shared with humility his own love of the Faith while at the same time expressing genuine, experience-based sympathy with my struggles.

Anyway, in this video for The Coming Home Network International, Dr. Robbins shares the rather moving story of his own reversion to the Faith.

(Just one quick hundred-dollar-word alert: “Hermeneutics” (pronounced her-men-oo-tics) means the science of interpretation — in other words, what “lens” we use to understand certain things)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

I’m not sure where to begin with this one.

I suppose I could start by noting the paradox of it: A condition traditionally associated with an excess of logical thinking, and concomitant deficit in affect, is here being linked to magical thinking.

On the other hand, neither is the image of the ethereal autistic child and her faraway gaze (more…)

Read Full Post »

In part one, I made the point that learning information doesn’t make sense (pun intended) apart from its sensory basis in early life — when, in philosophical terms, we start to abstract form from matter.

And I noted the sensory dysregulation that comes with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and its potential consequences for information processing.

Now we turn to an even older principle, to which English poet and Theologian Charles Williams referred as co-inherence. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Sometimes we have to go back in order to go forward.

With that in mind, let’s look at a couple of classic, practical concepts that could help turn the tide toward progress in relating to people with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). (more…)

Read Full Post »

For parts 1-4, click here

Let’s do a quick summary.  Here are some key points from part 4 regarding the premise of Forming Horizons: (more…)

Read Full Post »

For parts 1-3, click here

Ok — let me start by quoting myself:

[W]hen it comes to understanding people and their perspectives, nothing works better than encounter.

Encounter is, however, a formidable prospect for many people on the autism spectrum. And let’s face it, (more…)

Read Full Post »

For parts 1 and 2, click here

Okay — so in part 1 we talked bout my former autism website, Forming Horizons, and about a more traditional understanding of the word horizons as denoting limits rather than limitlessness.

Then in part 2 we talked about how, working within the “horizons” an ASD diagnosis brings (to all parties involved), we can discover and realize a greater range of possibilities than we thought existed by giving form to the potential inherent therein.

(“Potential” and “horizons” are interchangeable terms for our purposes — hence, Forming Horizons).

But we also recognized that it’s not that easy, that there are very real challenges that need to be faced.  I maintain that perception is a key source of both trouble and, more importantly, opportunity. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »