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Posts Tagged ‘Theology of the Body’

For parts one through three, click here

It is now time to talk about the effects of the Fall on men in particular.  We got into that a little bit in part two, if you remember, but not enough that we could have anything substantial to examine alongside the consequences for women discussed in part three.

So here goes…

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For part one, click here

Quick recap: A study covered on “Sunday Night With Megyn Kelly” revealed that six-year-old girls tend by an overwhelming margin to think their own gender of inferior intelligence compared to their male counterparts.

I suggested that the ubiquitous image of the “sexy female” in popular culture goes far to undermine girls’ sense of female dignity and, therefore, intelligence.

Okay — I also said we’d look at possible secular responses to this phenomenon, along with the thoughtful Catholic response I intend to share.

But I’ve changed my mind.  It is a little presumptuous of me to assume I can predict how the culture will respond, and such responses are hardly relevant until they are actually manifest.

So I’ll just share the Catholic response.  If anyone has a more secular viewpoint they’d like to share, please feel free to do so.

Meanwhile, here goes: (more…)

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Everyone catch the halftime performance at the Super Bowl last night?  If so, you’ll understand why I timed this post as I did.

Christopher West is a Catholic apologist and, most likely, the foremost American commentator on Pope St. John Paul II’s Theology of the Body.  In this short video, which he made in 2008, West takes a very balanced and heartfelt look at the songs of one of our culture’s most beloved current pop icons.

Fair warning: West’s style may seem like a lot to handle at first.  Not that he is “preachy” in any way, but he is…well, rather colorful at times.

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John_Paul_II_1980_croppedHere I am, nearly a week later, to talk about the second of our two recently canonized popes.  Why did it take me so long?  I suppose it was a combination of occupation with other matters, fatigue, and a bit of routine procrastination.

In any case, here’s what I have to say about Saint John Paul II:

First, I’ll try to address the controversy.  Some people have protested John Paul II’s canonization on the grounds that his response to the priestly sexual abuse crisis was inadequate, and perhaps even negligent.

Fr._Marcial_Maciel_LCMuch of the controversy surrounds the sexual improprieties of Fr. Marcial Maciel, founder of the Legion of Christ, under his pontificate.

I’ll state my defense very briefly.  May God have mercy on Fr. Maciel; but without a doubt, he behaved disgracefully and, to make matters worse, fooled a lot of people…and the pope was no exception.  Remember, sainthood does not mean that a person was gifted with perfect insight or circumspection in every situation.

Hammer_and_Sickle_Red_Star_with_GlowFurthermore, it may be useful to keep in mind that the sainted pope — born Karol Wojtyla in Wadowice, Poland — spent his later youth, early priesthood, and most of his episcopacy under Communist rule.  The governing Communist Party regarded the Catholic Church as a major enemy, and it was not uncommon for them to level false accusations against priests and put out propaganda against them.

That being the case, and knowing the great pressure his fellow priests were under by virtue of their sublime duties and societal misunderstanding, he most likely discerned that accusations against priests like Fr. Maciel needed to be taken with a grain of salt.  And unfortunately, this led to the matter not being looked into as it should have.

Pope John Paul I

Cardinal Wojtyla pictured with his predecessor, Pope John Paul I

But I beg of you, please let’s not allow this to shatter this man’s reputation.  It would be a shame to blind ourselves to all of the good Pope John Paul II did on account of what was undoubtedly a painfully tragic, yet understandable mistake.  What good did he do?  Let’s just run through a few brief examples:

1. Youth Outreach

World Youth DayOne of the late pontiff’s most memorable achievements was the inauguration of World Youth Day, which is but one expression of his constant and passionate outreach to the youth and young adults of the world.  In a time of uncertainty and pessimism, he appealed in a kind, fatherly fashion to the hopes and dreams of young hearts, thereby inspiring a whole new generation of faithful people to live their lives on fire for the Gospel.

2. Catholic-Jewish Relations

Yad VashemRelations between the Catholic Church and the Jews had undoubtedly been improving prior to Saint John Paul II’s papacy.  However, the strides he made in the improvement of said relations are truly legendary.  Having grown up with Jewish people as best friends and having experienced something of the horrors of the Holocaust, he saw it as part of his mission to make peace with the Jewish people, famously begging forgiveness at Yad Vashem for the sins of Christians against Jews over the centuries.  He also exhorted Catholics to look upon the Jews not as enemies or “Christ-killers,” but as our elder brethren in faith.

3. Ecumenical Dialogue

Pope John Paul II worked harder than any previous pope toward the cause of Christian unity.  He reached out in friendship to leaders and members of various Christian denominations, and even went so far as to ask for input into what, from their perspective, the papal office could do to aid the aforementioned cause.  He even signed the Joint Declaration on the Doctrine of Justification, a document produced by the Catholic Church’s Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity and the Lutheran World Federation.

4. Teachings on Human Sexuality

Theology of the BodyThis deserves a whole separate post, but I’ll say a few words here.  About two-thirds of the Catholic Church’s teaching on sexuality come from Pope John Paul II (not that he just pulled it out of thin air, but it needed to be “unpacked,” clarified, and developed).  Through his world-famous Theology of the Body, he helped people in a hyper-sexualized and sexually wounded world to understand the true nature of human sexuality…in opposition to two extremes: 1) A puritanical attitude that sees sex as evil or taboo; and 2) A vehicle for selfish pleasure.  In truth, sexuality goes right to the heart of what it means to be a human being — and, specifically, of what it means to be a man or a woman.  Indeed, when a man and a woman united in holy matrimony are lovingly engaged in the act of sex, they are imaging the God in Whose image they are made…the God who is self-giving love.

There are a number of other things I could mention (his pivotal role in the collapse of totalitarian regimes, f0r example); but to give you a sense of the great saint’s deep humanity, I want to leave you with a link to a clip.  I know it can be a pain to jump from one Web page to another — but please, just take a moment to have a look at this; it’s less than two minutes long (stop at 24:58): Interview with a former Swiss Guard member.

May we all learn to be more like this in our daily lives.

Saint John Paul II, pray for us!

Image of “Man and Woman He Created Them” from http://www.amazon.com; remaining images from Wikipedia

 

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Taking a break from the sci-fi posts to share a brief video featuring popular writer and speaker Christopher West.  If you ever wonder what the true Christian vision of sexuality is (and it may surprise you!), you will find this video well worth your time.

If you don’t watch the whole thing, I would recommend at least watching the first 3 minutes and 44 seconds.

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