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Posts Tagged ‘Tower of Bable’

For part one, click here

Just a quick quote from St. Paul to start:

For creation awaits with eager expectation the revelation of the children of God; for creation was made subject to futility, not of its own accord but because of the one who subjected it, in hope that creation itself would be set free from slavery to corruption and share in the glorious freedom of the children of God. We know that all creation is groaning in labor pains even until now… (Romans 8:19-22 — bold mine)

Dawn_Apes

Throughout the Old Testament, we see that while Israel is indeed the nation of the Chosen People, God gives the advantage to the nations surrounding Israel whenever the latter strays from its divinely appointed mission.

It is interesting to think of what it would look like if God were to go a step further.  What if He were to respond to the failure and sin of humanity, His true Chosen Race on earth, by giving the advantage of reason and en-soulment to the animals, or to anything else in creation?

Certainly, if He were to do so, the apes would seem to be the most logical choice.  They are, after all, the closest to us on the “Chain of Being” among all creatures in this world.

KobaMatt Reeves’ “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes” shows us what this scenario might look like.  In the film, apes have effectively dismantled human society, reclaimed nature for themselves, and basically taken charge of the earth.

Beyond that, their very attitude toward human beings is a kind of judgement.  We can say this particularly in the case of the antagonist ape Koba (Toby Kebbell), who learned hatred from humanity after years of being subjected to torture in their laboratories.

What does this have to do with the opening quote?  Well, that goes back to the Orpheus analogy in Part one.  Creation relies on us to exercise good stewardship; if we fail to do so, we will learn about it one way or another.  Science fiction and fantasy scenarios that explore this reality in extra-ordinary ways are worthy of our reflection.

movies-dawn-of-the-planet-of-the-apes-jason-clarkeAs for humanity itself, it is interesting to note that its trajectory from “Rise of the Planet of the Apes” to “Dawn” is not all that different from the trajectory of mankind in the Book of Genesis.

Confusion_of_TonguesHumanity’s sin reaches its height at the Tower of Babel, which men envisioned as a way of reaching heaven itself.  Likewise, the scientists in “Rise” — and many in today’s society — show forth a modern day Babel in their overreaching of ethical bounds in scientific and technological advancement.

The aftermath of Babel is well-known just about everyone with a rudimentary knowledge of the Bible:

…there the LORD confused the speech of all the world. It was from that place that he scattered them all over the earth. (Gen. 11:9)

In “Dawn,” the human community to which we are introduced is isolated, cut off from whatever remains of humanity.  That, in fact, is why Malcolm (Jason Clarke) and his team go into ape territory in the first place: They are sent to gain access to a hydroelectric dam that could potentially bring electricity and, by extension, contact with other surviving communities back to their own.

Jason Clarke _ Andy SerkisSo how does it end?  I won’t give anything away, but I will say this: We do not easily learn from our mistakes.  Throughout the Bible, throughout human history, in current events, in our own communities, families, and lives, and alas, in “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes,” we see something resembling the Orpheus story: It is much easier to turn around then to forge ahead, to turn to the darkness and to oneself in defensiveness or despair than to turn toward the light, so that our “works might not be exposed,” and lest we “be converted, and (God) heal (us)” (John 3:20, 12:40).

“Babel” image from Wikipedia; movie images obtained through a Google image search

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